Unlearning: Andra Pradesh

 So we were in a real village, with simple people, very basic facilities, no electricity and people who are fascinated by you. I mean ...


 So we were in a real village, with simple people, very basic facilities, no electricity and people who are fascinated by you. I mean initially I won't deny, I felt like a celebrity. We all did, but I also realized what a huge gap there was. Just two hours from there was the city, and things were completely the opposite.

Working with chindu was interesting as well as important for us to recognize that there is a certain section of society which might still be ill-treated. Something that we are against as well. The Dalits have been an oppressed class and the oppression still carries on, however in a different context now that the government is trying to compensate for all those years of ill-treatment.

Seeing the children at the village and the situation, we had to completely change our plan and we did some improv theater activities with the children in the village on the first day itself. We had no practice, everyone just went along with it. Since I was documenting this I saw how everyone collaborated and we all got a chance to work with Suresh and Sabrina, who are accomplished theater artists. I saw how they communicated with the other actors, giving them something to improvise on in each interaction, thereby leaving no empty spaces and awkward gaps. 

The following day the performance at the school was somewhat similar, much more disciplined though, because the head master was present of course. Everyone participated and it was fun and more organized the second time around.

Through working with a group of Dalit activists we were putting a new perspective to a few episodes of the ramayana, and I think the topic of oppression in society is both relevant and important in todays context.















You Might Also Like

0 comments